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dukakis because a lot of my family still lives there, and i'm from there. i lost boston in 1977 when i left u.p.a. and "the new york times" and moved to washington for "time" magazine. >> where did you go to school? >> i went to college in maine, and finished up at brandice university. >> when did you first get interested in photography? >> very, very young. i was maybe 10 years old, 11 years old. my stepsister was roberta who was a journalist at the "proof dins journal" and a gentleman named win parks was working there. i forgot the other gentleman's name. but there were two photographers there, and i had some interest in cameras. she brought one of them home, and they taught me a little bit about cameras. i set up a little dark room. i was maybe 11 or 12 when that happened. and then i dropped it, as kids do, for like 10 or 12 years, and then i worked on the high school year book. i was interested for four or five months, and then didn't touch the camera for 10 years, eight years. >> what got you back to it? >> it was interesting. when i finally went back to school, i went to brandice
's not my problem. seven news -- they take the news of the purchase back in the news arrives in boston so boston is the federalist territory. austin is the opposition that would surely want to deprive jefferson of any such tyamck and the way they signaled their opposition to the purchases they set off a fireworks display in celebration. this was not a controversial thing in american politics. american politicians were enthusiastic about this. the senate's starts to debate whether the ratification of the trade and treaty and the only obstacle arises is that jefferson himself gives strict instructions of the abuse of the power of government led him to play the federal government does not have the power to acquire territory. he starts to him and hans is needed constitutional amendment to give the government this power. napoleon who had overthrown -- >> host: and institutionalist. >> guest: not likely to be impressed and he starts making arguments. i will just revoke the treaty. it's not even ratified yet. madison comes to jefferson -- >> host: who is the secretary of state. >> guest: madison
relatives near boston was fine, vermont could not understand why they were calling. later that night when uncle louie finally got through, they gain some sense of the damage. he had had to leave his house and fight his way to the telephone office to get a line. all along main st. big old elms had fallen. the pine forest and paradise was wrecked and that was an area kind of unspoiled trees behind the house in windsor. it's now a beautiful park but it no longer has these immense pines that were there in the 30s. the pine forest and paradise was wrecked. the woods lamotte would say later look as if the giants have been playing jack straus. everywhere lewis said. ice was never the same. it would be nearly two years more before all hell broke loose around the globe. so, this is a digression. now we have to go back to egypt in 1942, but what was interesting anyway was what was about to happen to rob at this point as all hell was about to break loose for him. he would be moved to the front lines. he learned how to operate a wonderful, he thought it was a wonderful enormous gun called a six foun
in chicago and the mitt romney in boston. victory and concession speeche speeches,. >> we are engaged in the process and been working first in with fema, to make an overall assessment, that 25, up to 25% of those cell towers were disabled during this process. what the fcc does and will continue to do is to work with these entities, to assess the situation on the ground and to more so use this information to see where we can do adequate for. >> commissioner mignon clyburn on issues facing the commission as a year and. tonight at eight eastern on c-span2. >> tomorrow night watch election results from the presidential race as well as house, senate and governors contests across the country. we will have coverage a president obama in chicago and the mitt romney in boston. victory and concession speeches from candidates, plus your reaction of the election results throughout the night by phone, imo, facebook and twitter. live coverage begins tomorrow night at eight eastern on c-span, c-span radio in c-span.org. >> a look now at some other house races. we recently interviewed nathan gonzales,
in boston they reached their agreement on their teachers' union contract, and they have been fighting over for the past two years, and their contract that they just agreed to in boston is very similar to what is on the table in chicago. but boston has a no-strike clause. and even though they've been fighting over it for two years, they got a mediator from washington, d.c. to come in and work with these folks, work with both sides. they settled this thing. at the end of the day, no kids lost time, you know, out of the classroom. we're at the point now where -- and i believe -- that we need to evaluate these educational proposals based on one simple yardstick: will this help a child learn? and if the answer is yes, we should be for it. if the answer is no, we should be against it. so what will it take to change the dynamic? well, you know, there are a couple of things here. the solutions lie in, of course, accountability and quality teachers and autonomy. but, you know, one of the solutions also is parent choice. you know, i see as i go around the country that the more participants step up -
staff certainly said one thing but in boston at the romney headquarters my god was sensing a lot of confidence coming out of that building. unlike mr. romney and did have a concession speech prepared for this event as we thought through what the conversation would be like depending on the scenario but i had a few questions on election night. the first was remembering exactly what it felt like in 2004, where we had a dozen constitutional amendments passed all across the country. you had karl rove celebrated as the architect hewitt just built a new kind of republican electoral majority that would have legs in traction for a decade or two. you had a president who was reelected, not because of that within the toolkit was the use of the wedge issue, gay, gays and lgbt couples across the country. the dark and sort of fetal position and what i sensed on election night this year is how proud i am about our resilience. we picked ourselves up and we decided to fight and decided to start talking to republicans. we decided to demand more from our great democratic front. a lot of movements co
since then, they make more u-turns than a boston cab driver trying to get to the place where he was. when you look at the results of this election come you can try connect connection between policies president obama has led on a devoted support he got. if in the face republicans decide what they need to do is go back and do it even more conservative again, far be it for me to persuade them otherwise. we got another election in four years. i can levitate, but it wouldn't be wise. >> on the religion question i agree was blaise entry into. if you look at the polling of people less likely to vote for a candidate because they were more men, the majority of his people thought barack obama is a muslim who was born in canada country in kenya. it wasn't there to make it a negative, but it is true democrats did not make it an issue. >> some of the positions from me to turn the primaries really hurt specifically with regard to immigration reform. it is newt gingrich is that romney was the most conservative on that issue in any country where it is the fastest-growing bloc of voters, that's real
officials in boston who had this quote that said women politicians speak softly and carry a big statistic, and i don't think they speak softly anymore, but there is ad moo -- a model of women who came through the ranks against all odds focusing on accountability. running for county attorney, i looked at the records of napolitano because on the website they showed what the goals were and what they got done. you see that in the women and actually some of the male senators as well that made it through the election. while the balance of power stayed the same in washington, there was definitely a rejection of people who had rigid ideologies. people wanted to see things get done and compromise. they didn't want to see people swinging at each other from the opposite corner of the boxes ring. >> there's sometimes generalizations made about how women manage things, seen in business as well as politics, women are consensual, cooperate, more risk averse that has men. is that your experience in politics? do you think it matters to the pop -- population in general? there's men in the add -- audience,
here. >> hike in the stephen flynn from northeastern university in boston. on the issue of new normal, i wonder picking up on david's point about the price to post-9/11, is the sort of coming to grips with the hubris we could prevent bad things from happening, this huge investment in the post-secular world arabic ere we could ideally stop risk. actually coping with that is what we really need to increase and maybe just bring it very close to home. we just had this bashing mother nature in the area, priced at around $60 billion for a risk above the basic things like when you have tunnels that are only seven feet above water. it fills up the hole and you end up with 86 million gallons of oil in the tunnel and that's not hard to predict. putting safeguards in place in recovering this may be one element of this. basically the issue is that we focus too much on trying to prevent risk instead of managing it better? >> steve tried to argue for solace, which is an interesting concept. yes, back here. >> richard downey from the center for hemispheric u.s. david, you mentioned in the election t
takes command of the continental army he goes to boston and sees black men with guns and knows he's not going to build a self this to his brethren south carolina and georgia. he stops that. eventually he changed his mind when he needed more bodies and his army peer we always have to weigh these things. they are not black-and-white issues. he was a man of his time, part of the society utterly dependent on slavery and knew he was not going to change the minds of his fellow slaveholders. we point to these founding fathers and genuinely with admiration. but this was clearly where they did not see the great conflagration that was coming. how still out c. davis is the author on "in depth" on booktv on c-span 2. a better after we have with some questions have been preapproval shape as now. we have an hour and half program. we'll be right back. >> host: and we're back live with kenneth davis, author and historian in new york city. this is booktv on c-span 2. mr. davis come you say when it comes to your career, your writing career that she give a lot of credit to join davis. who is that? >
of the continental army goes up to boston, sees that there are black men with guns and knows he is not going to be able to sell this to his brethren in south carolina and georgia. he stops that. eventually changes his mind when he needed more bodies in his army. we always have to weigh these things. they are not simple black-and-white issues. yes he was a man of his times, he was a man who was part of a society that was utterly dependent upon slavery and he knew he was not going to change the minds of his fellow slaveholders. we point to these founding fathers and genuinely with admiration, but this was clearly where they did not see the great conflagration that "don't know much about literature: what you need to know but never learned about great books and authors" >> host: kenneth davis is our guest. every offer we have on in depth we ask some questions of them and we are going to show use those now. we have an hour-and-a-half left in our program and we will be right back with your phone calls. >> host: we are live with kenneth davis, author and historian in new york city, this is booktv o
officials allow back in boston who had this quote, not exactly accurate but she said that women politicians speak softly and carry a big statistic. i don't really think they speak softly anymore, but there is a model of women who have had to come through the ranks against all odds with a focus more on accountability. when i was running for county attorney i would look at the records of janet napolitano as governor of arizona, kathleen sebelius in kansas because on their website, they showed what their goals were and what they got done. and i think you see that in some of the women come and actually some of the male senators as well that made it to this election but while the balance of power stay the same in washington, there was definitely a rejection of people have a rigid ideology. people want to see things get done and copper much. they did want to see people swinging at each other from opposite corners of the boxing ring. >> the sometimes generations about how women to manage things everything in businesses it women tend to be more consensual. we all are good at co-oping. is that your
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)

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